CANCER IS AN INCREASED RISK FOR WOMEN IF THEY HAVE SLEEP APNEA

We know that men are more at risk of developing sleep apnea. But if you are a woman and you suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) your risk of developing cancer is more than your male counterparts, says a recent research published in the European Respiratory Journal. During the study the scientists collected data of 20,000 patients with OSA. It was found that around 2 per cent of these patients were later diagnosed with cancer.

Researchers analysed data based on age, gender, body mass index and smoking. Again, there was a strong association between sleep apnea and higher cancer prevalence. Additionally, the link was stronger in women than men.

A 2012 study identified a link between sleep and aggressive breast cancers. Ref: American Cancer Society

ADDITIONAL CASE STUDIES

In 2013, Spanish researchers reported that people with severe sleep apnea had a 65 percent increased risk for cancer. The risk is associated with increased hypoxia.

Another study from the Univ. of Wisconsin found people with sleep-disordered breathing are five times more likely to die from cancer than people without sleep apnea. 

One recent study reported in the Journal of Sleep Medicine shows moderate and severe cases of sleep apnea are associated with increased cancer risk. That study also showed an increased risk for all “all-cause mortality” and cancer mortality due to cancer. The 20-year study showed that people with moderate to severe cases of sleep apnea are two and a half times more likely to develop cancer and three times more likely to die from cancer. The authors noted these findings confirmed previous research conducted by American and Spanish researchers.

 With a convincing condemnation of Sleep Apnea as a cause of cancer we need to be more serious about screening patients for cancer and OSA.