Learn Dental Sleep Medicine in Baltimore, MD on May 5,6

Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
202 East Pratt St.
Baltimore, , MD , 21202

Dr. John Carollo will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

              Learn the CONSEQUENCES of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and HOW they happen:

Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers and treats sleep  disorders.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com
 
See the Two day course outline and register here:
PATIENTS ARE LOOKING FOR ‘UNIQUENESS” TODAY.
 I am sure you understand that now, more than ever, you need to stand out and be able to offer not only EXCELLENCE, but also DIFFERENCE. In this sluggish economy, where there is a perception of “financial doom”, (I personally don’t believe in that.), dental consumers have a tight hold on their wallets and there are reports of a concerning drop in dental treatment acceptance.
What are YOU doing now to offer a unique service? 
Your First Class Service and Patient Engagement are expected as basic “givens”. But what is your clinical niche? Are YOU the dental practice they must go to? Are you the only practice around that offers dental sleep medicine? And if so, are you promoting your unique brand to its full capacity?
EVOLUTION OF DENTAL DEMAND
Remember how it was about 25 years ago when teeth whitening (aka “bleaching”) was the “new kid on the block”? If you had an “in-office”Bright Smile or Zoom machine, you could schedule an operatory all day long with patients from near and far. And then we had the “porcelain age of dentistry”, when the media made patients very image-conscious for “smile enhancements” at any cost, and the public was more confident in the future of the economy . Teeth whitening is now offered in nearly every practice, and in most as a discounted loss leader. Cosmetic crowns and veneers are now a lower patient priority. Implants are no longer the privileged purview of dental specialists. Today Dental Sleep Medicine (DSM) is where those other exciting innovating services were years ago. You can get on board now and be a pioneer.
SO, WHERE ARE WE NOW?
The public is becoming increasingly aware that dentists are the ones who can offer the most convenient and cost effective solutions to their sleep breathing issues. Intra-oral appliances can only be provided by trained and licensed dentists. If you have a unique brand, promote it, let it make you famous! If you need one, the hottest niche in dentistry today is Dental Sleep Medicine. One out of every three patients you see has symptoms of a sleep breathing disorder (SBD). You can get your initial training and begin to screen and treat patients for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) at www.SleepGS.com

You can kill a good presentation by trying to explain too much. You know what the patient needs and he/she probably knows too.

Most of your patients will listen to you and be big picture” processors. They will want to know the BASICS- how long, how much, and the result. They may even tell you that. You can determine how they process information from their metaphors and body language. The few “detail oriented” patients will be the accountants, engineers,… and other dentists. If you give too many details in your presentation, you will open Pandora’s Box, for even the “Big Picture” patients, to start a litany of questions. Avoid such statements as, “…then the Hygienist will scale, root plane and irrigate….”, or “… after I prepare your teeth, I’ll take some impressions, and….”

[ The Hygienist “removes disease” and you are “creating a great new smile”. It’s that simple! ]

There’s a time and a place for those detail explanations, but it is not during the case presentation. For now just concentrate on the value and the benefits. KISS. “Keep It Simple, Stupid.”     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle

Make your presentations well planned-out and concise. Utilize visual aids and social confirmations.

Picture your desired OUTCOME, then trim away the excess like a Michelangelo:

A 15th Century admirer looked in awe at one of Michelangelo’s sculptures and asked the maestro how he could create such a magnificent sculpture from a block of marble. Michelangelo said, “I saw the angel in the marble and I carved away the excess until I set him free.”

Here’s a humorous but poignant example:

The young doctor had just completed his first Treatment Plan Presentation for a big cosmetic makeover. He followed all the tips given by his coach. He demonstrated with study models, radiographs and photographs, and clearly detailed to his patient every situation requiring treatment. His presentation was planned, orchestrated and smoothly presented.

He explained an ideal treatment to his patient which the doctor had estimated at $29,500. The young doctor did not yet have a financial coordinator and had to present the investment himself. It was his first case over a few thousand dollars. He went into great detail then froze and could not give the fee.
The patient seemed impressed with the understanding that the doctor showed of his dental condition, and the benefits from the proposed treatment and told him that. “Doc, I realize that I neglected my dental condition for a long time and that I need a lot of work………..but honestly, I have no insurance and I can’t go over $35,000.”
With that the doctor snapped back, “That’s exactly what it will cost!”
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We “Spring forward” on Sunday, March 12 at

 2:00 A.M. and lose an hour of sleep.
 

Are you planning to get to bed one hour earlier?   In order to fulfill the essential number of regenerating sleep cycles the adult requirement is 7-8 hours.

                                    Do you sleep soundly or sleep with sound?

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Are you keeping your partner awake? Ask your dentist if you can be tested for Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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HISTORY OF DST 

The story of DST can be traced back as far as Ben Franklin, who, as the American envoy to France, pioneered the concept that Parisians could make better use of daylight– and potentially save money on candles– by waking up earlier in the morning. 

It wasn’t until 1966 that the U.S. got its first national daylight saving–

the Uniform Time Act of 1966– in large part based on the concerted efforts of The Chamber of Commerce.” 

That’s right. National daylight saving policy wasn’t developed for the benefit of farmers, it was actualized based on lobbying on behalf of department stores.

Here’s how to get fast and easy CE credits and score even greater benefits:

Have your Dental Study Club or local Dental Association schedule a speaker for a Dental Sleep Medicine presentation. We will provide a nationally known DSM speaker, all materials, CE credits and most importantly, a valuable introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine.
 Hands-on traininghttps://adental.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/4-20-13-gelb-3.jpg
Presentation Outline
These DSM presentations include:
  • analysis of patients’ symptoms and how to screen for them
  • scripts for an effective patient interview
  • how to motivate the Dental team to commit their patients
  • how to get your patients to “own” their disease
  • the morphology of the airway
  • comorbidities to look out for
  • the effects on the systemic organs
  • the reimbursement strategy and insurance billing using dental and medical coding.
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Dentists who attended our DSM presentations have gone on to secure huge rewards for their patients and their practices. Email me at <cskdoc@aol.com> to find an available date for a presentation to your study club or dental society meeting.

 

Are you a smoker? If so, the chances are that you have obstructive sleep apnea. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than are people who have never smoked.
skull-smoking
The Correlation
Smoking may irritate the tissues in your nose and throat and cause inflammation and fluid retention in your upper airway. This swelling causes a blockage which restricts air flow.
Both smoking and OSA are deadly conditions that, in combination, will wreak havoc to your quality of life and can severely shorten your life span.
Both sleep apnea and smoking can cause all sorts of cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. OSA can lead to stroke and heart disease while smoking increases one’s chance of contracting mouth, throat and lung cancer. Studies have even shown that sleep apnea victims who smoke, generally have heightened triglyceride levels and lowered HDL levels.
The Studies
The average person loses 1.2 minutes of sleep for every cigarette they smoke, due to nicotine’s stimulating and subsequent withdrawal effects, according to a  2013 University of Florida study,
 
Men’s Health reported, “People who smoke within two hours of bedtime struggle to fall asleep because the nicotine disrupts their natural sleep-wake cycle, and withdrawal symptoms set in before the morning alarm goes off, often leaving smokers feeling even more restless and agitated.”
Patients who suffer from untreated sleep apnea are rarely able to reach the cycles of deep sleep where dreaming occurs. With treatment, patients begin to dream again and it takes time to get used to it.  Vivid dreaming is a common occurrence in those who are in the process of quitting smoking and have begun sleep apnea treatment.
Conclusion
A 20012 report in Chin Med concludes:Smoking may act as a risk factor for OSA and join with OSA in a common pathway to increase the risk of systematic injury. OSA, in turn, may be a predisposing factor for smoking. Thus, smoking cessation is recommended when considering treatment for OSA, and treating OSA may be a necessary precondition for successful smoking cessation.”
 Resources
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Johns Hopkins University 2008 
University of Florida
Men’s Health
Chin Med
Mayo Clinic
WebMD

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Most people think the ideal amount of sleep is eight hours per night. As it turns out, that number is just a myth. Some people need more sleep to function optimally during the day, while others require less. Thankfully, it’s possible to work out your own magic number with a little experimentation. Here’s how it’s done.

Dr. Michael Breus, sleep specialist and author of The Power of When, says that the average person only needs 7.5 hours of sleep a night.

“I’ve been a 6.5 hour sleeper almost my entire life,” Breus says. “But my wife needs 8.5. Everybody is different.”

What’s a sleep drive?

The reason for that is that sleep — specifically your sleep drive — is genetically predetermined, according to Breus.

Your sleep drive is a lot like your hunger drive. Just like your hunger drive makes you want to eat when you’re feeling hungry, your sleep drive makes you want to sleep when you’re feeling tired.

Your sleep drive also determines the speed at which you have a sleep cycle.

As a general reference, most people go through five 90-minute sleep cycles per night, Breus says. That’s why the average person needs 7.5 hours of sleep. Five cycles of 90 minutes each works out to be 450 minutes in total, which is the equivalent of 7.5 hours. However, some people’s cycles are longer or shorter.

When figuring out the ideal amount of sleep you need per night, Breus suggests starting with 7.5 hours as an approximation.

How to figure out your sleep drive:

Take the time that you usually wake up and count back 7.5 hours. So if you normally wake up at 7 a.m., you would need to go to bed at 11:30 p.m. to get 7.5 hours of sleep. Make it a point to go to bed at 11:30 p.m. for seven to 10 days.

Breus says that if by the end of those seven to 10 days, you’re waking up around five minutes before your alarm goes off, 7.5 hours is your ideal amount of sleep.

If, however, your alarm is still waking you after those seven to 10 days, try going to bed half an hour earlier. Keep moving your bedtime up by 30 minutes until you wake up just before your alarm. The number of hours you end up with is how much your body needs.

Unfortunately this method won’t work for everyone. According to Breus, about 50% of the population has what’s called a chronotype. A chronotype refers to everyone’s own biological clock — so when people are early birds or night owls, or just have trouble sleeping in general.

Night owls and early birds need to fit their lives to their chronotype:

Breus says that while people with a chronotype still need around 7.5 hours of sleep, they need to adjust the window of time in which they get that sleep. These people need to fit their lives to their chronotype, and not the other way around.

Breus uses himself as an example. He’s a night owl and never goes to bed before midnight. Because of this, his whole day shifts later. He’s found that he’s way more productive when he does things later in the day, so he’s adjusted accordingly.

Sleep is a critically important part of life, so be aware of your needs and respect them.

To learn more about the science of sleep and sleep breathing disorders (SBD) such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), read here: www.SleepGS.com.

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