Archives for posts with tag: CE credits
In order to fulfill the essential number of regenerating sleep cycles the average adult needs 7-8 hours. A five stage sleep cycle repeats consistently throughout the night. One complete sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes. So during an average night’s sleep (8 hours), an adult will experience about four or five cycles of sleep.
A Little History of Daylight Saving Time
The concept of setting the clocks ahead in the spring in order to make better use of natural daylight was first introduced in the US by inventor Benjamin Franklin in 1784.

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US President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted year-round DST in the United States, called “War Time” during World War II from February 9, 1942 to September 30, 1945. The change was implemented 40 days after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and during this time, the U.S. time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”. After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Peace Time”.
Congress decided to end the confusion and establish the Uniform Time Act of 1966 that stated DST would begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the first Sunday of November. However, states still had the ability to be exempt from DST by passing a local ordinance.
This fall, dentists will not need to “fall backward” in their practice. They have the opportunity to “spring forward” with Dental Sleep Medicine and help the millions of their Sleep Apnea victims. 
Upcoming training seminars by DSM experts are available in the following cities:
Nov 2017
PHILADELPHIA, PA – 11/03/2017 – 11/04/2017
SAN JOSE, CA – 11/03/2017 – 11/04/2017
ANAHEIM, CA – 11/10/2017 – 11/11/2017
NASHVILLE, TN – 11/10/2017 – 11/11/2017
PHOENIX, AZ – 11/10/2017 – 11/11/2017
ALBUQUERQUE, NM – 11/17/2017 – 11/18/2017
CHICAGO, IL – 11/17/2017 – 11/18/2017
TORONTO, CANADA – 11/17/2017 – 11/18/2017
LIP 8
 You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/
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THE OPPORTUNITY
It was only three years ago that I read that less than 1% of American licensed dentists were practicing sleep medicine. In those few years that number has risen to 4%. If we have approximately 205,000 practicing dentists in the USA, then there are only 8200 Dentists serving the needs of The multitude of people affected with sleep disorders.
According to a Harvard health report there are 18.9 million undiagnosed cases of obstructive sleep apnea and a minimum of 40% – 1.3 million-of CPAP users are non-compliant. So that alone conservatively projects 20.2 million victims of obstructive sleep apnea who may be helped by a dentist trained in oral appliance therapy (OAT).
Is there any better opportunity in dentistry?                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Dental sleep medicine: the hottest button in dentistry today.
Awareness of sleep apnea in America is at an all-time peak. The fires of awareness are being stoked by the public media and by social media. Patients are understanding and becoming increasingly more concerned about the blockage of oxygen to the brain into other organs. Strokes. Heart attacks. Diabetes. Dementia. People are recognizing that they have the symptoms and are asking their Dentists about it. Some doctors have the solutions. Every Dentist would like to be “The Sleep Dentist.”
Where to begin?
Seminar training courses are now available through Sleep Group Solutions every week, in different cities, throughout the United States. They are training dentists to discover the victims of sleep apnea and to treat them with the most appropriate modalities. Oral appliance therapy (OAT) is the most convenient and preferred therapy for the mild and moderate cases and for those patients who cannot tolerate the CPAP device. Fortunately, this is where the dentist in shining armor rides in on a white horse to the rescue. Dentists, we like to say, are on the front line of the battle against sleep apnea. Dentists are in the optimum position to see the signs and symptoms and can offer the most preferred solutions to the problem. A professional coach guiding the development of the process will make the
process advance quicker, smoothly and more effectively.
Keys to success
Success in treatment acceptance and end point attainment varies with, and depends upon, each individual dentist’s knowledge and determination and his or her patient’s cooperation. The training program will present the tools, screening protocols, diagnostic equipment, techniques and some verbal skills for success. As in other healthcare therapies, a partnership between the professional provider and the patient is the key to success. The patient’s cooperation is essential. Compliance will keep them under control. So that explains the patient’s role in the “Partnership for Success”.
The Dentist’s Responsibilities
Beginning with the seminar training program, the dentist must be 100% committed to success. (Anything we endeavor will be more likely to be achieved when we are positive that we will succeed.) The seminar training is only the beginning of the learning process. We must retain what we have learned, continue to study, to research all new ideas and to practice our treatment plan presentations with our teams. 

You are in the right place at the right time. As a Care Giver, think of how you can serve a critical need of your patients. They are looking for your help.
You may contact me with questions or for assistance in becoming “The Dental Sleep Professional”.
Yours for better health,
Charles Kravitz DDS
Are you ready to join the battle?  
       
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Strike while the iron is hot
PATIENTS ARE LOOKING FOR ‘UNIQUENESS” TODAY.
 I am sure you understand that now, more than ever, you need to stand out and be able to offer not only EXCELLENCE, but also DIFFERENCE. In this sluggish economy, where there is a perception of “financial doom”, (I personally don’t believe in that.), dental consumers have a tight hold on their wallets and there are reports of a concerning drop in dental treatment acceptance.
What are YOU doing now to offer a unique service? 
Your First Class Service and Patient Engagement are expected as basic “givens”. But what is your clinical niche? Are YOU the dental practice they must go to? Are you the only practice around that offers dental sleep medicine? And if so, are you promoting your unique brand to its full capacity?
EVOLUTION OF DENTAL DEMAND
Remember how it was about 25 years ago when teeth whitening (aka “bleaching”) was the “new kid on the block”? If you had an “in-office”Bright Smile or Zoom machine, you could schedule an operatory all day long with patients from near and far. And then we had the “porcelain age of dentistry”, when the media made patients very image-conscious for “smile enhancements” at any cost, and the public was more confident in the future of the economy . Teeth whitening is now offered in nearly every practice, and in most as a discounted loss leader. Cosmetic crowns and veneers are now a lower patient priority. Implants are no longer the privileged purview of dental specialists. Today Dental Sleep Medicine (DSM) is where those other exciting innovating services were years ago. You can get on board now and be a pioneer.
SO, WHERE ARE WE NOW?
The public is becoming increasingly aware that dentists are the ones who can offer the most convenient and cost effective solutions to their sleep breathing issues. Intra-oral appliances can only be provided by trained and licensed dentists. If you have a unique brand, promote it, let it make you famous! If you need one, the hottest niche in dentistry today is Dental Sleep Medicine. One out of every three patients you see has symptoms of a sleep breathing disorder (SBD). You can get your initial training and begin to screen and treat patients for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) at www.SleepGS.com

Here’s how to get fast and easy CE credits and score even greater benefits:

Have your Dental Study Club or local Dental Association schedule a speaker for a Dental Sleep Medicine presentation. We will provide a nationally known DSM speaker, all materials, CE credits and most importantly, a valuable introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine.
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Presentation Outline
These DSM presentations include:
  • analysis of patients’ symptoms and how to screen for them
  • scripts for an effective patient interview
  • how to motivate the Dental team to commit their patients
  • how to get your patients to “own” their disease
  • the morphology of the airway
  • comorbidities to look out for
  • the effects on the systemic organs
  • the reimbursement strategy and insurance billing using dental and medical coding.
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Dentists who attended our DSM presentations have gone on to secure huge rewards for their patients and their practices. Email me at <cskdoc@aol.com> to find an available date for a presentation to your study club or dental society meeting.

 

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Most people think the ideal amount of sleep is eight hours per night. As it turns out, that number is just a myth. Some people need more sleep to function optimally during the day, while others require less. Thankfully, it’s possible to work out your own magic number with a little experimentation. Here’s how it’s done.

Dr. Michael Breus, sleep specialist and author of The Power of When, says that the average person only needs 7.5 hours of sleep a night.

“I’ve been a 6.5 hour sleeper almost my entire life,” Breus says. “But my wife needs 8.5. Everybody is different.”

What’s a sleep drive?

The reason for that is that sleep — specifically your sleep drive — is genetically predetermined, according to Breus.

Your sleep drive is a lot like your hunger drive. Just like your hunger drive makes you want to eat when you’re feeling hungry, your sleep drive makes you want to sleep when you’re feeling tired.

Your sleep drive also determines the speed at which you have a sleep cycle.

As a general reference, most people go through five 90-minute sleep cycles per night, Breus says. That’s why the average person needs 7.5 hours of sleep. Five cycles of 90 minutes each works out to be 450 minutes in total, which is the equivalent of 7.5 hours. However, some people’s cycles are longer or shorter.

When figuring out the ideal amount of sleep you need per night, Breus suggests starting with 7.5 hours as an approximation.

How to figure out your sleep drive:

Take the time that you usually wake up and count back 7.5 hours. So if you normally wake up at 7 a.m., you would need to go to bed at 11:30 p.m. to get 7.5 hours of sleep. Make it a point to go to bed at 11:30 p.m. for seven to 10 days.

Breus says that if by the end of those seven to 10 days, you’re waking up around five minutes before your alarm goes off, 7.5 hours is your ideal amount of sleep.

If, however, your alarm is still waking you after those seven to 10 days, try going to bed half an hour earlier. Keep moving your bedtime up by 30 minutes until you wake up just before your alarm. The number of hours you end up with is how much your body needs.

Unfortunately this method won’t work for everyone. According to Breus, about 50% of the population has what’s called a chronotype. A chronotype refers to everyone’s own biological clock — so when people are early birds or night owls, or just have trouble sleeping in general.

Night owls and early birds need to fit their lives to their chronotype:

Breus says that while people with a chronotype still need around 7.5 hours of sleep, they need to adjust the window of time in which they get that sleep. These people need to fit their lives to their chronotype, and not the other way around.

Breus uses himself as an example. He’s a night owl and never goes to bed before midnight. Because of this, his whole day shifts later. He’s found that he’s way more productive when he does things later in the day, so he’s adjusted accordingly.

Sleep is a critically important part of life, so be aware of your needs and respect them.

To learn more about the science of sleep and sleep breathing disorders (SBD) such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), read here: www.SleepGS.com.

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Can you tolerate any more cancellations and no-shows?

Seen enough snow plows for a while?
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Round up your spouse and kids, dig out your car from the mountains of snow, drive to the airport and leave Snowzilla behind. Come down to sunny Ft. Lauderdale for a few days. Enjoy our weather (73 degrees today) and take our 2-day Dental Sleep Medicine training on Feb. 3,4.
While your family is running around spending your money in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale you will be learning a valuable new dental service. But don’t worry about that because when you get back home you’ll quickly recover your total weekend costs as a Sleep Medicine Dentist.
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Register here for the 16 CE credit Dental Sleep Medicine course: