Archives for posts with tag: Continuing Ed
By Charles Kravitz, DDS in Women’s Health
According to an article in the European Respiratory Journal, “Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 50% of females aged 20-70 years. 20% of females have moderate and 6% severe sleep apnea.” 
Swedish scientist Dr. Karl Franklin and his team set out to find out how prevalent sleep apnea is among women and how often symptoms occur. Out of a population-based random sample of 10,000 women between the ages of 20 and 70 years, they gathered data on 400 of them. The test group were given questionnaires which included several questions regarding their sleeping habits and sleep quality. They also underwent overnight polysomnography.

WOMEN ARE LESS LIKELY TO BE DIAGNOSED FOR SLEEP APNEA

Women with sleep apnea are less likely to be diagnosed compared to men. In studies of patients registering for evaluation for sleep apnea, the ratio of men to women has sometimes been extremely lopsided, with 8 or 9 men diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) for each woman found to have OSA. However, we know from studies in the general population that the actual ratio is likely to be closer to 2 or 3 men with OSA for each woman who has the condition.

Women make up about 45 percent of sleep study referrals and most sleep studies are still done to screen for sleep apnea.

WHY ARE WOMEN LESS LIKELY TO BE DIAGNOSED FOR SLEEP APNEA?

First, there is an unfortunate predefined notion of the make-up of a sleep apnea patient. The stereotype is a middle-age, overweight or obese male. Physicians may not be thinking of this OSA diagnosis when the patient is female. Second, women may present with slightly different symptoms than the “classic” symptoms of snoring, witnessed breathing pauses at night and excessive sleepiness during the day.

Instead, women may present with fatigue, insomnia, disrupted sleep, chronic fatigue and depression morning headaches, mood disturbances or other symptoms that may suggest reasons other than OSA for their symptoms. Because these symptoms are not specific for OSA, women may be misdiagnosed and are less likely to be referred to a sleep study for further evaluation. Another problem is that women with sleep apnea have more subtle breathing disturbances and are more likely to have REM-related apneas, so they may be tougher to diagnose.

WOMAN SNORING 5-25-15

 

SOME DIFFERENCES IN SYMPTOMS BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN

Sleep apnea in females is related to age, obesity and hypertension but not to daytime sleepiness. 

The “classic” symptoms of OSA are snoring, witnessed apneas and daytime sleepiness, but women may not experience these things. Weight gain, depression, waking up gasping for breath, hypertension, and dry throat in the morning may be tip-offs for women that they may need an evaluation.

Women who are obese, pregnant women, and post-menopausal women all have a greater risk for OSA. Finally, women with the endocrine disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome, are more likely to have sleep apnea even after controlling for weight and should seek clinical evaluation.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OSA AND HYPERTENSION IN WOMEN AND MEN

Obstructive sleep apnea is a significant risk factor for heart disease . The prevalence of hypertension in people with sleep apnea ranges between 30-70 percent and is similar in men and women. However, when taking body mass index (BMI) into consideration, some gender differences emerge: men with OSA who are markedly obese (BMI > 37) have a two-fold higher risk of hypertension than obese women with OSA.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OSA AND DIABETES IN WOMEN AND MEN

Women with OSA tend to be more obese and have lower AHI  than males; however, studies have also suggested that women may have a higher mortality.   OSA is associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes independent of obesity.

Women who are obese, pregnant women, and post-menopausal women all have a greater risk for OSA. Finally, women with the endocrine disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome, are more likely to have sleep apnea even after controlling for weight and should seek clinical evaluation.

COMMON SLEEP APNEA MISDIAGNOSES

Women are often diagnosed in error with one of the following conditions, rather than sleep apnea.

  • Anemia
  • Cardiac or pulmonary illnesses
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Fatigue from overwork
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hypertension
  • Hypochondria
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Insomnia
  • Menopausal changes
  • Obesity
  • Sources
  • Dr. Karl Franklin, European Respiratory Journal
  • Grace W. Pien MD, MS, assistant professor of medicine, divisions of Sleep Medicine and Pulmonary and Critical Care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
  • Nancy A. Collop , MD, medical director at Johns Hopkins Hospital Sleep Disorders Center and associate professor of medicine at Hopkins’ Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in Baltimore, Md .
  • Fiona C. Baker, PhD, sleep physiologist, Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, in Menlo Park, Calif.
  • Anita L. Blosser, MD, with Duke Primary Care at the Henderson Family Medicine Clinic in Henderson, N.C.
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Retired? Or just tired?

 Looking for something more exciting to top off your dental career?
A dentist who is selling a practice and those who are worn out from years of intense dedication to detail are looking for alternatives. They want to hang up the loupes but are wondering what to do next.

After a long productive career of interacting with people in need, it is difficult to go “cold turkey”, even if golf is a passion.

There is a great solution awaiting you.

The laborious, long, stressful day in the operatory can be replaced with a very productive, rewarding, stress-free patient service.   You can choose how many days you want to work, where you want to provide the service and what kind of patients you want to see. And your rewards, both financial and emotional, will be greater than ever.

Dental Sleep Medicine!

 Treating patients for sleep breathing disorders is an excellent way to continue your public service and receive even greater income in shorter hours than practicing general dentistry. Practicing DSM can be the apex of your public service career. Nothing in dentistry can compare to the ROI you will receive.

You may contact me cskdoc@aol.com for further information.

Here are some of the benefits (not in any order of importance):

  1. Acquire New Patients- lots of them.

People are recognizing that they have sleep breathing symptoms and are searching for Dentists who can help them.

  1. Serve an Underserved Need

    According to a Harvard health report there are 18.9 million undiagnosed cases of obstructive sleep apnea and 40% (1.3 million) of CPAP users are non-compliant.

  1. Increased Income

You have heard the reports about the huge successes with DSM. With the new DSM patients come other needed services.

  1. Professional Pride, Prestige and
  2. The feeling of significance

One of the basic human needs is to feel significant. It is a personal reward we can give ourselves. We dental professionals enjoy a lifetime of helping our patients. Caring for people is one of the driving forces that made us choose this career. It makes us feel good to know we are helping people to avoid pain, eat healthier, and feel more confident about their appearance. That is all great. But how does it compare to the feeling of saving a patient’s life? When you know you have taken patients who spend half their night’s sleep without oxygen going through their airway and to their brain- and you have corrected their life-threatening disease, how does that make you feel? Significant! You will feel like a hero.

How do you get started?

If you are interested enough to have read this far, you have already started. To succeed in DSM you must have passion to continuing helping people and excitement for being at the forefront of a new medical/dental science. With only 4% of dental practices qualified to offer these services, you can be proud to be a medical/dental pioneer.

The introduction for your education is to attend a DSM training seminar. There you will learn all the basics. Sleep Group Solutions presents two-day seminars every weekend in two different cities. The “Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine” covers all aspects “from A to Pay”. You will learn the mysteries of the science of sleep, a functional protocol for screening and treating patients, how to find patients who need your services, the various intra-oral appliances and how to monitor their efficacy, and billing benefits with medical codes.

Send your questions to me at cskdoc@aol.com.

We know we have received great benefits from our dental and hygiene careers. We built social, emotional and economic strength for ourselves through our hard and smart work. Now we can “pay it forward” Share your tips, ideas, advice with the dental community on the LinkedIn DENTAL MENTORS network.  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4746892  
Every one of us is an expert in some area(s) that can help others. Join this non-promotional group and have that good feeling about mentoring others.
Are you declaring your independence from those things that interfere with your quality of living? You can use Independence Day as a incentive to start a personal revolution.
Here’s a good place to start:
Are you and your spouse disgusted with the snoring that forced you into separate bedrooms?  A great percentage of couples have separated and many have divorced because they didn’t seek a simple solution- an intra-oral device to wear during sleep, paid by insurance and made by a qualified Sleep Medicine dentist that will prevent snoring and treat sleep apnea.
Find a sleep qualified dentist and get freed from your snoring. Dentists are the first line of defense to help you in this battle. 

 John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail:

“The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.”

Coincidentally, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the only signers of the Declaration of Independence later to serve as Presidents of the United States, died on the same day: July 4, 1826, which was the 50th anniversary of the Declaration. Although not a signer of the Declaration of Independence, but another Founding Father who became a President, James Monroe, died on July 4, 1831, thus becoming the third President in a row who died on the holiday. 

 

Dr. Sidney Shaw was an old-fashioned type dentist. He had a conservative treatment approach to the practice of dentistry, he exuded an obvious passion for helping his patients, and everyone loved him. He had an admired and successful general dental practice.  At the ripe young age of 66 he was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and his doctor told him he had to slow down. That’s when he made the painful decision to hang up his loupes, put his practice up for sale and reap the rewards from the 38 years of hard work invested into building his practice. He felt he could retire comfortably on his proceeds from the sale.

He contacted a dental transition realtor who conducted a very comprehensive practice valuation. To Sidney’s dismay the valuation reported a market value of 310,000. This was more than disappointing to Sidney; it was devastating. It was not enough to support him and his wife and their medical bills.


“Disappointment is a temporary obstacle on the road to success.”

Sidney’s astute transition Broker came up with an idea. If he could implement a dental sleep medicine program he could add another two to three hundred thousand dollars in value to his sale price.
With his health scare Sidney made some major business decisions. He hired an associate, he cut back to three half days a week, he took a training course, got some private coaching and concentrated on screening and treating his patients for sleep apnea.
Within two months of making his decision he was treating two patients, on average, each day for sleep apnea. His average income for each case was $3500. This amounted $21,000 a week for three easy, relaxed, rewarding half days a week. This projected to revenues of an incr
 edible $1,050,000. for a 50 week year. This may sound like “pie in the sky” but when you check around you will find examples like this being quietly conducted all throughout the nation.
The happy ending:
Sidney sold his practice for 2.5 times more than that original market value and he stayed on 3 half days a week as a ” sleep specialist” for the new owner. How is that for a ROI of two months’ training?
If you are interested in getting into this exciting, rewarding, life-saving Dental Sleep Medicine field you may contact me at cskdoc (aol) for more information.

 

11-8-11 LIBERTY

As part of the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty, five live web-cams were installed in Ms. Liberty’s torch, in her crown, and at the harbor. There’s also a Panorama of the NJ and NY skylines, Ellis Island, and the New York-New Jersey Harbor.

There’s live audio too, so you can hear the whoosh of aircraft overhead and the honk of boat horns as YOU watch the ships steam across the bay. Click on this link to look and listen: http://www.earthcam.com/usa/newyork/statueofliberty/

Click on any of the five pictures and enjoy a live streaming video… day or night, 24/7, starting now.

I wish I could have been there:  When Lady Liberty was still in her youth, my parents saw her on their freedom voyage from Kiev, in Ukrania (then part of the Russian Empire) to Ellis Island. I can only imagine their teenage excitement and fulfillment of hope when they saw Lady Liberty from their ship. They were so proud and determined to become Americans- in every way. They quickly learned to speak English and adapted to every American way of life. I am very proud of them.

11-8-11 LIBERTY b

The one time I saw The Statue of Liberty was from a US Army troop ship returning from Europe to the Port of New York on a foggy morning. The scene is emblazoned in my memory.

On Monday May 29th, 2017 let’s remember the Veterans of our struggles for Liberty who never returned to see this beautiful tribute.

Memorial Day occurs every year on the final Monday of May. It is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces. Formerly known as Decoration Day, it originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. By the 20th century Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who have died while in the military service. It typically marks the start of the summer vacation season, while Labor Day marks its end.

Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries.

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The preferred name for the holiday gradually changed from “Decoration Day” to “Memorial Day”, which was first used in 1882. It did not become more common until after World War II, On June 28, 1968, the Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to a specified Monday in order to create a convenient three-day weekend.The change moved Memorial Day from its traditional May 30 date to the last Monday in May. Memorial Day endures as a holiday which most businesses observe because it marks the unofficial beginning of summer.

On Memorial Day the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day.

9-10-12 flag anmd soldier

Here’s the National Memorial Day parade on Capitol Hill Mall
5-23-12 MEM DAY PARADE

“If you told an athlete you had a treatment that would reduce the chemicals associated with stress, that would naturally increase human growth hormone, that enhances recovery rate, that improves performance, they would all do it. Sleep does all of those things.”  ~ Casey Smith, Head Athletic Trainer, Dallas Mavericks

The Boston Red Sox built a “Sleep Room” in Fenway Park because they knew the Value of Sleep.

The Red Sox are flush with advantages on the field and deep inside Fenway Park. According to the Boston Globe,, the team has what they’ve dubbed a “sleep room,” a 145-square-foot space with two sets of bunk beds where players and coaches can get in a power nap ahead of home games. Many sports teams have learned that sleep improves performance.

Dentists are learning how to treat the victims of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. There are 18 million people undiagnosed. Are you ready to help them?   http://www.SleepGS.com